Little Esmeralda (1874) (Detail)
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825–1905)
oil on canvas

Little Esmeralda (1874) (Detail)

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825–1905)

oil on canvas

(Source: sadnessdollart, via jaded-mandarin)

plinycapybara said: I'm really, really nervous about starting Latin in the fall. Its my first time learning. I'm so scared. Is there any books or sources that could help me prepare myself?

classicsenthusiast:

First of all, it is entirely normal to feel scared or worried about learning a new language, especially when it is one as potentially difficult as Greek or Latin. But I find that if you take the time to get used to the basics, learning everything else gets much easier. So, here are some things that I think might help:

Latin pronunciation guide: (x)

The First Declension for nouns: (x)

The Present Indicative Active verb form, 1st Conjugation:

  • Amō          - I love
  • Amās        - You love
  • Amat         - He/she/it loves
  • Amāmus   - We love
  • Amātis      - You (pl) love
  • Amant       - They love

And here is a post I did on the uses of Latin Cases.

But most importantly, you have to just stay calm. If you’re taking Latin as a class, your teacher probably assumes that most of the people learning are completely new to it, so you should be learning the basics and everything else you need to know there.

Learning a little bit ahead of time is good, but it’s always best to learn when you have someone you know you can go to for help or clarification. It’s what teachers are for, after all! Just make sure you truly learn all that you need to early on in your class (and I mean learn, don’t just memorize and hope for the best), and you should do just fine :)

I hope this helps!

colourthysoul:

Eduard Veith - Madonna With Jesus Surrounded By Children (1896)

(via adrianxxx777)

The light of this knowledge is the gift of God, which by His will He bestoweth upon whom He pleaseth. Let none therefore set himself to the study hereof, until having cleared and purified his heart, he devote himself wholly unto God, and be emptied of all affection and desire unto the impure things of this world.

archaicwonder:

Syro-Hittite Ceramic Double Headed Pillar Figurine, c. 2750 - 1900 BC
The Hittites were from Anatolia, establishing a kingdom in the Bronze Age that reached its height in approximately the 14th century BC. This piece most likely a represents a figure from their highly symbolic religion in which Storm gods figured prominently in intricate mythologies. There are numerous references to the Hittites in the Bible, usually depicted as living among the Israelites yet belonging to their own kingdoms outside Canaan.
This double-headed figurine is highly stylized with exaggerated eyes and noses surrounded by unique designs around the head. The details of the necks and the band that separates the head from the arms help to contain this piece and give it strength. The hands show individual fingers carefully laid across the figure’s breast in a protective embrace. This figurine is quite ancient and is in excellent condition to reveal a rare and beautiful form of early sculpture.

archaicwonder:

Syro-Hittite Ceramic Double Headed Pillar Figurine, c. 2750 - 1900 BC

The Hittites were from Anatolia, establishing a kingdom in the Bronze Age that reached its height in approximately the 14th century BC. This piece most likely a represents a figure from their highly symbolic religion in which Storm gods figured prominently in intricate mythologies. There are numerous references to the Hittites in the Bible, usually depicted as living among the Israelites yet belonging to their own kingdoms outside Canaan.


This double-headed figurine is highly stylized with exaggerated eyes and noses surrounded by unique designs around the head. The details of the necks and the band that separates the head from the arms help to contain this piece and give it strength. The hands show individual fingers carefully laid across the figure’s breast in a protective embrace. This figurine is quite ancient and is in excellent condition to reveal a rare and beautiful form of early sculpture.

(Source: baidun.com)

leradr:

Gate in Volterra, EtruriaAlexander Svedomsky(1848-1911)

leradr:

Gate in Volterra, Etruria
Alexander Svedomsky(1848-1911)

(via marcuscrassus)

Latin Case Uses

classicsenthusiast:

Nominative - The case generally used for the Subject of the sentence

  • That dog ate Caesar’s sandwich.”

Although it can be used in other contexts, this is the main use for the Nominative case.

Genitive - Usually translated with an “of,” and is often used to show possession:

  • "That dog ate Caesar’s sandwich.”
  • "The swiftness of that dog makes him angry.” 

The genitive case can also be used adverbially, often for accusations:

  •  ”He accused the dog of theft.”

Can also be used as a partitive, denoting part of a whole:

  • "Some of the men laughed at Caesar.”
  • "Few of those men will live.”

Additionally, it can be used objectively:

  • "They should have a great fear of/for Caesar

Those are most of the primary uses of the Genitive case, but not all.

Dative - Usually the indirect object of a verb, and is translated with "to, for."

  • "That dog gave the sandwich to Brutus.”
  • "That dog stole the sandwich for Brutus.”

The dative case can also be used to show possession or care for an action, especially when paired with the verb “to be.”

  • "I believe that sandwich was mine (for me).”

It was also be used to denote the agent of an action, but only when paired with the gerundive, to show who’s responsibility the necessary action is.

  • "I need to be apologized to by you.” 

Accusative - Usually the direct object of a verb:

  • "That dog ate Caesar’s sandwich.”

It can also denote an extent of space or duration of time:

  • "I have only had this dog for two minutes.”
  • "It was ten yards away from you.”

These are the basic uses of the Accusative.

Ablative - Often translates as "with, from, by" something. (The Ablative Case does not appear in Ancient Greek)

  • "I saw you with that dog." (Accompaniment)

But it can show on what time or from what place something has come, or where an action takes place:

  • On this day, that dog stole my sandwich.”
  • "That dog came from your home, Brutus.”
  • "That dog took my sandwich on that hill.”

Ablative can also show who has performed an action (Personal Agent):

  • "I know this was planned by you, Brutus.”

Or it can show separation:

  • "I was far from you when it happened, Caesar.”

Or it may show the means by which something is done, or in what manner:

  • "You stole by sandwich (by means of/with) that dog.”
  • "And you stole it quite cruelly.”

And finally, it can be used with comparatives, to denote degree of difference, or show comparisons:

  • "You are much angrier than a normal man ought to be.”
  • "You are more cruel than I, Caesar.”

The ablative has many, many uses, but these are a few of the most common.

Vocative - Used when speaking to someone directly.

  • O Brutus, why did your dog take my sandwich?”

And here is a link to a wonderful declension chart I found, courtesy of Ben Crowder.

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Wreath of Oak Leaves and Flowers, possibly from Attica, Greece, late 2nd - early 1st century BC
In ancient Greece,  oak leaves symbolized wisdom, and were associated with Zeus, who according to Greek mythology made his decisions while resting in an oak grove.
Gold wreaths such as this one derive their form from wreaths of real leaves worn in religious ceremonies or given as prizes in athletic and artistic contests. Because of their fragility, gold wreaths were probably not meant to be worn. They were dedicated to the gods in sanctuaries and placed in graves as funerary offerings. Although known in earlier periods, gold wreaths became much more frequent in the Hellenistic age, probably due in large part to the greatly increased availability of gold in the Greek world following the eastern conquests of Alexander the Great.

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Wreath of Oak Leaves and Flowers, possibly from Attica, Greece, late 2nd - early 1st century BC

In ancient Greece,  oak leaves symbolized wisdom, and were associated with Zeus, who according to Greek mythology made his decisions while resting in an oak grove.

Gold wreaths such as this one derive their form from wreaths of real leaves worn in religious ceremonies or given as prizes in athletic and artistic contests. Because of their fragility, gold wreaths were probably not meant to be worn. They were dedicated to the gods in sanctuaries and placed in graves as funerary offerings. Although known in earlier periods, gold wreaths became much more frequent in the Hellenistic age, probably due in large part to the greatly increased availability of gold in the Greek world following the eastern conquests of Alexander the Great.

(Source: historymuseum.ca, via reactionarytraditionalist)

centuriespast:

Huichol Indian family, man holding musical instrument, woman holding baby, Mexico, 1895
American Museum of Natural History

centuriespast:

Huichol Indian family, man holding musical instrument, woman holding baby, Mexico, 1895

American Museum of Natural History

design-is-fine:

Leonardo da Vinci, Emblem of his Academy in Milan. Including the Vinci Knot. It was later reproduced through various printings, the first engraving from 1495 see here. Even Dürer made his own version. This pic is from a dust jacket, 1938. NYPL
Leonardo’s knot patterns are similar to the Celtic designs like in the Book of Kells, but probably were inspired by arabesques from the middle east.

design-is-fine:

Leonardo da Vinci, Emblem of his Academy in Milan. Including the Vinci Knot. It was later reproduced through various printings, the first engraving from 1495 see here. Even Dürer made his own version. This pic is from a dust jacket, 1938. NYPL

Leonardo’s knot patterns are similar to the Celtic designs like in the Book of Kells, but probably were inspired by arabesques from the middle east.

(via theworkingtools)

The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.

arthubblog:

The Last Judgment, c. 1466Hans Memling (c. 1433 – 1494), GermanThis painting is regarded as Memling’s most monumental work of religious art. It was painted in Bruges and was meant to be a part of the central altarpiece of a chapel in Florence, Italy. But en route it was seized by pirates and carried off to Poland. — at National Museum, Gdańsk.

arthubblog:

The Last Judgment, c. 1466
Hans Memling (c. 1433 – 1494), German

This painting is regarded as Memling’s most monumental work of religious art. It was painted in Bruges and was meant to be a part of the central altarpiece of a chapel in Florence, Italy. But en route it was seized by pirates and carried off to Poland.
— at National Museum, Gdańsk.

(via demoniality)

(Source: artgif, via mythologer)

jopenb:

Statue of Aphrodite, known as the Venus of Arles. Hymettus marble, Roman artwork, imperial period (end of the 1st century BC), might be a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by Praxiteles. The apple and the mirror were added during the 17th century. Found in the antic theatre of Arles, France.

(via mythologer)

irelandseyeonmyth:

ohcamil:

they-hide-in-the-dark:

The Púca -
The most feared of all Irish fairies, the Púca is a shapeshifting goblin that only comes out at night. It has the ability to take any form it wants but its favourite form is that of a horse. Its other common forms include: a dog, rabbit, goat or that of an old man. All of its forms have black hair or fur and have glowing yellow eyes. It can also speak while in any of its forms, but it loves to lie and use speech to trick people for its own entertainment. 
The Púca’s favourite thing to do is turn into a horse and find drunk men who are on their way home. The horse then offers the man a ride. When the man accepts the Púca takes him on the wildest ride of his life, racing across fields, preforming death defying leaps and generally scaring the man out of his wits. When the sun starts to rise the Púca will stop so suddenly that the man is thrown from the horse. They are also fond of taking a human form in order to sit and talk to a person for hours before suddenly disappearing and leaving the person very confused. In some tales their behaviour goes further than simple tricks, some of them are bloodthirsty and will attack and eat people. They have also been known to poison crops and berries. 
The only thing that will get rid of a Púca is sunlight. 

Wait, is this why Harvey the rabbit was called a “pooka”?  (I never did know how to spell it, that’s just how it’s always looked in my head.)
Mind blown.

wow I didnt know they called him a pooka. Its possible. A 6 foot invisible rabbit pooka hah.

irelandseyeonmyth:

ohcamil:

they-hide-in-the-dark:

The Púca -

The most feared of all Irish fairies, the Púca is a shapeshifting goblin that only comes out at night. It has the ability to take any form it wants but its favourite form is that of a horse. Its other common forms include: a dog, rabbit, goat or that of an old man. All of its forms have black hair or fur and have glowing yellow eyes. It can also speak while in any of its forms, but it loves to lie and use speech to trick people for its own entertainment. 

The Púca’s favourite thing to do is turn into a horse and find drunk men who are on their way home. The horse then offers the man a ride. When the man accepts the Púca takes him on the wildest ride of his life, racing across fields, preforming death defying leaps and generally scaring the man out of his wits. When the sun starts to rise the Púca will stop so suddenly that the man is thrown from the horse. They are also fond of taking a human form in order to sit and talk to a person for hours before suddenly disappearing and leaving the person very confused. In some tales their behaviour goes further than simple tricks, some of them are bloodthirsty and will attack and eat people. They have also been known to poison crops and berries. 

The only thing that will get rid of a Púca is sunlight. 

Wait, is this why Harvey the rabbit was called a “pooka”?  (I never did know how to spell it, that’s just how it’s always looked in my head.)


Mind blown.

wow I didnt know they called him a pooka.
Its possible. A 6 foot invisible rabbit pooka hah.