Mel Gibson Jewish Question interview Part 2#

cyclops1092:

The modern Catholic church did abandon the real faith. So did all of the scaled down American churches. He is a purist and that’s totally fine. The jews ARE responsible for many wars. And many financial crimes driving others to poverty. L
ike what they were trying to do with Germany. Jews had been ousted from every country in Europe at one time or another. The founding fathers of America tried to block Jews from settling in the country. No hatred for Jews coming from me personally. Just facts piling up. And if your a gentile trying to come back on this, think again. Because they don’t like you even if you try to defend them. They will bleed you dry if they can. Believe it! Take this jew owned falsehood called the ‘Obama Administration’ for instance. They are trying to buy their way into American politics to bring us to our knees. Just like they tried to do in Germany. Only those guys had more balls to preserve the integrity of their country at any cost. Sadly, we are letting them tear away at the flesh of our wonderful country and everyone is too zombified to think clearly or take action. So go ahead and fire back at me. Your only mad because I speak the truth!

khaste-irooni:

Palestine, 1918

khaste-irooni:

Palestine, 1918

(via conscientious-layman)

Jerome Hines - I walked today where Jesus walked

I walked today where Jesus walked,
In days of long ago.
I wandered down each path He knew,
With reverent step and slow.

Those little lanes, they have not changed,
A sweet peace fills the air.
I walked today where Jesus walked,
And felt Him close to me.And felt His presence there.

My pathway led through Bethlehem,
A memory’s ever sweet.Ah! mem’ries ever sweet
The little hills of Galilee,
That knew His childish feet.That knew those childish feet

The Mount of Olives, hallowed scenes,
That Jesus knew before
I saw the mighty Jordan roll,
As in the days of yore.

I knelt today where Jesus knelt,
Where all alone he prayed.
The Garden of Gethsemane,
My heart felt unafraid.

I picked my heavy burden up,
And with Him at my side,
I climbed the Hill of Calvary,
I climbed the Hill of Calvary,
I climbed the Hill of Calvary,
Where on the Cross He died!

I walked today where Jesus walked,
And felt Him close to me.

To some, the truth is an insult, to others, life from the dead.

Gary Amirault (via heartbloodspirit)
jcassian:

In his desire to expiate our crimes, Jesus voluntarily abandoned himself to an infinite sorrow for all our excesses.  He saw them all, one by one, and was afflicted by them beyond measure, as if he himself had committed them, for he was charged with them before God.  Yes, our iniquities poured upon him from every direction, so that he could say with David, “the torrents of iniquity troubled me.”  This is why he said, “Now is my soul trouble.”  This was the cause of the inexplicable anguish that brought him to pronounce these words: “My soul is very sorrowful, even unto death.”  The immensity of sorrow could, in fact, have dealt the death blow itself, if Jesus had not restrained his soul, preserving it to endure greater evils and to drink the whole cup of his Passion.  He nevertheless allowed his blood to overflow in the Garden of Olives to convince us that our sins - yes, our sins alone, without the executioner’s help - could have brought about his death.  Can you believe that sin could have such great and evil power?  If we only saw Jesus fall into the hands of the soldiers who scourged, tormented, and crucified him, we would blame his death only upon this torture.  Now that we see him succumb in the Garden of Olives, where he has only our sins to persecute him, we may accuse ourselves.  Let us weep, beat our breasts, and tremble in the very depths of our conscience.  How could we not be seized with fright, having ourselves, in our very hearts, so certain a cause of death?  If sin alone sufficed to kill God, how can mortal men survive with such a poison in their bodies?  No.  We exist only by a continuous miracle of mercy.  The same divine power that miraculously sustained the soul of the Savior, that he might endure the whole punishment, sustains ours that we might accomplish our penance, or at least begin it."Meditations for Lent"Jacques Bossuet

jcassian:

In his desire to expiate our crimes, Jesus voluntarily abandoned himself to an infinite sorrow for all our excesses.  He saw them all, one by one, and was afflicted by them beyond measure, as if he himself had committed them, for he was charged with them before God.  Yes, our iniquities poured upon him from every direction, so that he could say with David, “the torrents of iniquity troubled me.”  This is why he said, “Now is my soul trouble.”  This was the cause of the inexplicable anguish that brought him to pronounce these words: “My soul is very sorrowful, even unto death.”  The immensity of sorrow could, in fact, have dealt the death blow itself, if Jesus had not restrained his soul, preserving it to endure greater evils and to drink the whole cup of his Passion.  He nevertheless allowed his blood to overflow in the Garden of Olives to convince us that our sins - yes, our sins alone, without the executioner’s help - could have brought about his death.  Can you believe that sin could have such great and evil power?  If we only saw Jesus fall into the hands of the soldiers who scourged, tormented, and crucified him, we would blame his death only upon this torture.  Now that we see him succumb in the Garden of Olives, where he has only our sins to persecute him, we may accuse ourselves.  Let us weep, beat our breasts, and tremble in the very depths of our conscience.  How could we not be seized with fright, having ourselves, in our very hearts, so certain a cause of death?  If sin alone sufficed to kill God, how can mortal men survive with such a poison in their bodies?  No.  We exist only by a continuous miracle of mercy.  The same divine power that miraculously sustained the soul of the Savior, that he might endure the whole punishment, sustains ours that we might accomplish our penance, or at least begin it.

"Meditations for Lent"
Jacques Bossuet

(via jesus-logos)

vicemag:

Israel Is Forcing Palestinians in East Jerusalem to Demolish Their Own Homes 
In the Shu’Fat neighborhood of East Jerusalem, Palestinian Iyad Al-Shaer stood inside the gutted interior of a modest breeze block structure. The building, an addition to Iyad’s own home, was set to be a new residence for his brother Baser and his fiancé. But the fully furnished home, complete with a heart-covered bedroom that Baser had designed for his future child, now had three gaping holes punctured in its roof.
Just days after completing construction, the Israeli-controlled municipality issued Iyad a demolition order for his “illegally” constructed home, built without one of the expensive permits issued by the same set of authorities. Unable to afford the protracted and costly legal battle, he chose to destroy the structure himself.
Self-demolitions like this began a few years ago and have continued—albeit somewhat under the mainstream media’s radar—ever since, with Palestinians compelled to destroy their own homes in order to avoid the steadily increasing fines leveled by the municipality.

The demolished roof of Iyad’s brother’s home
While the Palestinian population in the city has quadrupled to over 300,000 since 1967, municipal authorities have only zoned nine percent of East Jerusalem land for Palestinian construction. Even with this space being set aside, permits are rarely granted, and the result is widespread “illegal” Palestinian construction—which, of course, Israeli authorities can then order to be demolished.
Tens of thousands of Jerusalem’s Palestinian residents now live under the constant threat of having their homes demolished by Israeli authorities, part of a policy of displacement that has been taking place in Jerusalem with a startling degree of public support for more than four decades.
“We know that there are some 20,000 ‘illegal’ Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem,” Jeff Halper of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions (ICAHD) told us. “[That’s] about a third of the Palestinian housing stock.”
“They don’t consider us citizens, so they push. It’s not a personal thing—I am one of many,” says Iyad. “They push us to go outside of Jerusalem. I call it a soft transfer.”
Continue

vicemag:

Israel Is Forcing Palestinians in East Jerusalem to Demolish Their Own Homes 

In the Shu’Fat neighborhood of East Jerusalem, Palestinian Iyad Al-Shaer stood inside the gutted interior of a modest breeze block structure. The building, an addition to Iyad’s own home, was set to be a new residence for his brother Baser and his fiancé. But the fully furnished home, complete with a heart-covered bedroom that Baser had designed for his future child, now had three gaping holes punctured in its roof.

Just days after completing construction, the Israeli-controlled municipality issued Iyad a demolition order for his “illegally” constructed home, built without one of the expensive permits issued by the same set of authorities. Unable to afford the protracted and costly legal battle, he chose to destroy the structure himself.

Self-demolitions like this began a few years ago and have continued—albeit somewhat under the mainstream media’s radar—ever since, with Palestinians compelled to destroy their own homes in order to avoid the steadily increasing fines leveled by the municipality.

The demolished roof of Iyad’s brother’s home

While the Palestinian population in the city has quadrupled to over 300,000 since 1967, municipal authorities have only zoned nine percent of East Jerusalem land for Palestinian construction. Even with this space being set aside, permits are rarely granted, and the result is widespread “illegal” Palestinian construction—which, of course, Israeli authorities can then order to be demolished.

Tens of thousands of Jerusalem’s Palestinian residents now live under the constant threat of having their homes demolished by Israeli authorities, part of a policy of displacement that has been taking place in Jerusalem with a startling degree of public support for more than four decades.

“We know that there are some 20,000 ‘illegal’ Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem,” Jeff Halper of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions (ICAHD) told us. “[That’s] about a third of the Palestinian housing stock.”

“They don’t consider us citizens, so they push. It’s not a personal thing—I am one of many,” says Iyad. “They push us to go outside of Jerusalem. I call it a soft transfer.”

Continue

hyperb0rean:

Today, April 20th, marks the 125th Birthday of Adolf Hitler, the Man Against Time. 
Coincidentally, this year, his birthday takes place on the same day as the Resurrection of Jesus Christ.
Even 
though the attitude of Adolf Hitler towards Christianity remains ambiguous, there is no doubt, at all, that each one of these personalities has altered the course of history, and shaped the face of the world, each in his own way. Adolf Hitler was the most powerful man at his time and his Imperium stretched from the Far East all the way to the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. However, even this Greater Germanic Reich, manifested by the triumph of Adolf Hitlers’ will, was not meant to last in this World. What remains is a grand vision transcending anything he did or did not achieve during his brief lifetime. A vision that rose up from the ashes of a Reich in ruins.
Adolf Hitler has witnessed foulness festering among mankind, corrupting what once was sacred, noble and pure. He became reformer up in arms, gathering faithful disciples while he forged the destiny of a Nation. Eventually, he was brought down by the combined force of his numerous enemies. But he returned from the valley of the shadow of death; as the eternal Truth, as the everlasting inspiration, as the immortal vision that can guide us from the darkness of the bottomless pit up to the light of a New Dawn. On his Birthday, we show our utmost reverence and gratitude to the Man Against Time. He lives on in our hearts, as we preach his gospel and live by his word. Heil Hitler!

(via reactionarytraditionalist)

Christians Who Don’t Celebrate Easter: What Do They Know?

article by Jerold Aust

Easter is the most important holiday for hundreds of millions of believers around the world. Yet thousands of Christians don’t observe it. Do they know something that others don’t?

Every spring, the anticipation and excitement of Easter is electrifying for many people. Churches prepare elaborate Easter programs that illustrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Parents take time to color Easter eggs and hide them so their children can hunt for them.

It’s typical for TV movies this time of year to depict Easter as an enjoyable occasion of renewed happiness. Television advertisements and commercial businesses also get very involved with Easter as they offer colorful Easter baskets, Easter costumes and chocolate rabbits to celebrate this great religious event.

Many churches advertise outdoor Easter sunrise services, with any and all invited. Weather permitting, the Easter celebration is visually reinforced by watching the sun rise in the east.

But what do bunnies and colored eggs have to do with Jesus’ resurrection?

And if this celebration is so important, why didn’t Jesus teach His apostles and the early Church to observe it? The books of the New Testament were written over a span of decades after Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection, yet nowhere do we see so much as a hint of any kind of Easter celebration.

So where exactly did Easter and its customs come from? Why do hundreds of millions of people celebrate the holiday today?

Can we find Easter in the Bible?

Easter is considered the most important religious festival in today’s Christianity. “The Easter feast has been and still is regarded as the greatest in the Christian church, since it commemorates the most important event in the life of its Founder” ( The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1986, Vol. 2, “Easter”). Given its popularity, one would think that surely this observance is found in God’s Word.

Some cite Acts:12:4 as authority for celebrating Easter. But there’s a problem in that Easter isn’t really mentioned there at all. The King James Bible translators substituted “Easter” for the Greek word Pascha, which means “Passover.” “The word [Easter] does not properly occur in Scripture, although [the King James Version] has it in Acts:12:4 where it stands for Passover, as it is rightly rendered in RV” (ibid.).

The vast majority of Bible translations recognize this error in the King James Version and rightly translate the word as “Passover” in Acts:12:4. The truth is, “there is no trace of Easter celebration in the [New Testament]” (ibid.)

Where did Easter come from?

If Easter isn’t found in the Bible, where exactly did it come from? And just exactly what does the name Easter mean?

It’s important to review credible historical sources to understand the celebration’s true history. For example, The Encyclopaedia Britannica tells us: “At Easter, popular customs reflect many ancient pagan survivals—in this instance, connected with spring fertility rites, such as the symbols of the Easter egg and the Easter hare or rabbit” (15th edition, Macropaedia, Vol. 4, p. 605, “Church Year”).

In the ancient world of the Middle East, people were far more connected to the land and cycles of nature than we are today. They depended on the land’s fertility and crops to survive. Spring, when fertility returned to the land after the long desolation of winter, was a much-anticipated and welcomed time for them.

Many peoples celebrated the coming of spring with celebrations and worship of their gods and goddesses, particularly those associated with fertility. Among such deities were Baal and Astarte or Ashtoreth, mentioned and condemned frequently in the Bible, whose worship typically included ritual sex to promote fertility throughout the land.

It was only natural to the peoples of the ancient Middle East to incorporate symbols of fertility—such as eggs and rabbits, which reproduce in great numbers—into those pagan celebrations for their gods. As The Encyclopaedia Britannica notes above, Easter eggs and the Easter rabbit are simply a continuation of these ancient spring fertility rites.

Nineteenth-century Scottish Protestant clergyman Alexander Hislop’s work The Two Babylons is still considered a definitive work on pagan customs that survive in today’s religious practices.

On Easter, he wrote: “What means the term Easter itself? It is not a Christian name. It bears its Chaldean origin on its very forehead. Easter is nothing else than Astarte, one of the titles of Beltis, the queen of heaven, whose name, as pronounced by the people of Nineveh, was evidently identical with that now in common use in this country. That name, as found by [early archaeologist Sir Austen Henry] Layard on the Assyrian monuments, is Ishtar” (1959, p. 103).

The name Easter, then, comes not from the Bible. Instead its roots go far back to the ancient pre-Christian Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar, known in the Bible as Astarte or Ashtoreth .

Ancient resurrection celebrations

What did worship of this goddess Ishtar involve? “Temples to Ishtar had many priestesses, or sacred prostitutes, who symbolically acted out the fertility rites of the cycle of nature. Ishtar has been identified with the Phoenician Astarte, the Semitic Ashtoreth, and the Sumerian Inanna. Strong similarities also exist between Ishtar and the Egyptian Isis, the Greek Aphrodite, and the Roman Venus.

"Associated with Ishtar was the young god Tammuz [mentioned in Ezekiel:8:14], considered both divine and mortal . . . In Babylonian mythology Tammuz died annually and was reborn year after year, representing the yearly cycle of the seasons and the crops. This pagan belief later was identified with the pagan gods Baal and Anat in Canaan ” ( Nelson’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary, 1995, “Gods, Pagan,” p. 509).

Alan Watts, expert in comparative religion, wrote: “It would be tedious to describe in detail all that has been handed down to us about the various rites of Tammuz . . . and many others . . . But their universal theme—the drama of death and resurrection—makes them the forerunners of the Christian Easter, and thus the first ‘Easter services.’ As we go on to describe the Christian observance of Easter we shall see how many of its customs and ceremonies resemble these former rites” ( Easter: Its Story and Meaning, 1950, p. 58).

He goes on to explain how such practices as fasting during Lent, erecting an image of the deity in the temple sanctuary, singing hymns of mourning, lighting candles and nighttime services before Easter morning originated with ancient idolatrous practices (pp. 59-62).

Another author, Sir James Frazer (1854-1941), knighted for his contributions to our understanding of ancient religions, describes the culmination of the ancient idolatrous worship this way: “The sorrow of the worshippers was turned to joy . . . The tomb was opened: the god had risen from the dead; and as the priest touched the lips of the weeping mourners with balm, he softly whispered in their ears the glad tidings of salvation.

"The resurrection of the god was hailed by his disciples as a promise that they too would issue triumphant from the corruption of the grave. On the morrow . . . the divine resurrection was celebrated with a wild outburst of glee. At Rome, and probably elsewhere, the celebration took the form of a carnival" ( The Golden Bough, 1993, p. 350).

A new celebration with ancient idolatrous roots

In various forms, worship of this god under the names Tammuz, Adonis and Attis, among others, spread from the outer reaches of the Roman Empire to Rome itself. There a truly remarkable development took place: Early Catholic Church leaders merged customs and practices associated with this earlier “resurrected” god and spring fertility celebrations and applied them to the resurrected Son of God.

The customs of the ancient fertility and resurrection celebrations weren’t the only ones morphed into a new “Christian” celebration, but they are among the most obvious. After all, many historians readily admit the origin of the name Easter and the ancient fertility symbolism of rabbits and decorated eggs (which you can verify yourself in almost any encyclopedia).

Frazer observes: “When we reflect how often the Church has skilfully contrived to plant the seeds of the new faith on the old stock of paganism, we may surmise that the Easter celebration of the dead and risen Christ was grafted upon a similar celebration of the dead and risen Adonis” (p. 345).

He goes on to note that the desire to bring heathens into the Catholic Church without forcing them to surrender their idolatrous celebrations “may have led the ecclesiastical authorities to assimilate the Easter festival of the death and resurrection of their Lord to the festival of the death and resurrection of another Asiatic god which fell at the same season . . . the Church may have consciously adapted the new festival [of Easter] to its heathen predecessor for the sake of winning souls to Christ” (p. 359).

Surprisingly, the celebration of Easter didn’t finally win out until A.D. 325, nearly 300 years after Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection!

As the Catechism of the Catholic Church explains in the section titled “The Liturgical Year,” “At the Council of Nicaea in 325, all the Churches agreed that Easter . . . should be celebrated on the Sunday following the first full moon . . . after the vernal equinox” (1995, p. 332).

Up until this time, many believers had continued to commemorate Jesus’ death through the biblical Passover as Jesus and the apostles had instructed (Luke:22:19-20

; 1 Corinthians:11:23-26



). Now, however, with the power of the Roman Empire behind it, the Catholic Church enforced its preference for Easter. Those who wished to continue to observe the biblical Passover had to go underground to avoid persecution.

Would Jesus Christ celebrate Easter?

The record of the New Testament is clear: The faithful members of the early Church continued to observe all that the apostles taught them, as they were taught by Jesus Christ. The record of history is equally clear: In later centuries new customs, practices and doctrines were introduced that were quite foreign to the original Christians, forming a new “Christianity” they would scarcely recognize.

So a key question is, should a Christian follow what Jesus taught or what later religious teachers taught?

It’s always a good idea to ask the question, what would Jesus do?

If Jesus were in the flesh today, would He celebrate Easter? The simple answer is No. He does not change. “Jesus Christ is the same, yesterday, today, and forever,” as Hebrews:13:8 tells us (emphasis added throughout). Jesus never observed Easter, never sanctioned it and never taught His disciples to celebrate it. Nor did the apostles teach the Church to do so.

Today, Jesus would observe the biblical Passover and Days of Unleavened Bread as Scripture teaches and as He practiced and taught (John:13:15-17


; 1 Corinthians:5:7-8

). In fact, He specifically said that He anticipated observing the Passover with His true followers “in My Father’s kingdom” after His return (Matthew:26:26-29



).

The feasts of Passover and Unleavened Bread have deep meaning to Christ’s true disciples. They reveal aspects of God’s plan for the salvation of humanity—commemorating the fact that Jesus died for us and lives in us and for us (1 Corinthians:11:26; Galatians:2:20; Colossians:3:3-4

).

Should you observe Easter?

If you want to be a true disciple of Christ Jesus, you need to carefully examine whether your beliefs agree with the Bible. It is not acceptable to God to merely assume that He approves of or accepts non-biblical celebrations, regardless of whether they are done for proper motives.

The fact is that God says, “Learn not the way of the heathen”—those who don’t know God’s truth (Jeremiah:10:2, King James Version).

His Word gives us explicit instructions regarding worshipping Him with practices adopted from pagan idolatry: “Do not inquire after their gods, saying, ‘How did these nations serve their gods? I also will do likewise.’ You shall not worship the Lord your God in that way; for every abomination to the Lord which He hates they have done to their gods . . . Whatever I command you, be careful to observe it; you shall not add to it nor take away from it” (Deuteronomy:12:30-32


).

Jesus Christ now commands everyone to repent of following all man-made religious traditions: “Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent” (Acts:17:30; compare Matthew:15:3).

Will you honor Christ’s lifesaving instructions so that God can bless you? He said: “If anyone serves Me, let him follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also. If anyone serves Me, him My Father will honor” (John:12:26).

God wants you and me to obey His life-giving Word. When we do, we can serve Christ as His ambassadors on earth. There is no greater calling on earth and throughout time. For your ongoing happiness and security, turn to God now and seek His complete and perfect way. GN


historicallyminded:

The Annunciation Cathedral shortly after the Bolshevik rebellion - Yaroslavl (1918)

historicallyminded:

The Annunciation Cathedral shortly after the Bolshevik rebellion - Yaroslavl (1918)

zerogate:

“The forbearing use of power does not only form a touchstone, but the manner in which an individual enjoys certain advantages over others is a test of a true gentleman. The power which the strong have over the weak, the employer over the employed, the educated over the unlettered, the experienced over the confiding, even the clever over the silly—the forbearing or inoffensive use of all this power or authority, or a total abstinence from it when the case admits it, will show the gentleman in a plain light The gentleman does not needlessly and unnecessarily remind an offender of a wrong he may have committed against him. He cannot only forgive, he can forget; and he strives for that nobleness of self and mildness of character which impart sufficient strength to let the past be but the past. A true man of honor feels humbled himself when he cannot help humbling others.”

General Lee (via jarthurbloom)

art-of-swords:

Steel double-edged Sword

  • Dated: 16th - 18th century
  • Place of Origin: Zanzibar
  • Measurements: overall lenght 83.8 cm

Featuring a long blade, slightly tapering at the rounded point, the hilt of the sword comes with a dome-shaped pommel and down-turned quillons. The latter is pierced at each junction.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Bonhams


Portrait of Ulrik Scheffer, Detail.
by Alexander Roslin, 1763

Portrait of Ulrik Scheffer, Detail.

by Alexander Roslin, 1763

(Source: sadnessdollart, via jaded-mandarin)

Red Ice Radio - Ricardo Duchesne - The Uniqueness of Western Civilization & Multicultural Madness

zerogate:

Ricardo Duchesne teaches sociology and world history at The University of New Brunswick, Saint John, Canada… His book, The Uniqueness of Western Civilization, a major work of 528 pages, was released in February 2011. Currently he is doing research on multiculturalism and the identity crisis of the West.

We’ll discuss how in recent decades, the field of world history has been relentless in its downgrading of the idea of Western uniqueness in pursuit of a multicultural point of view. Ricardo Duchesne calls into question much of the scholarly research seeking to justify an anti-Eurocentric spirit and counter-critiques the revisionist movement. We’ll talk about how the revisionist movement strongly disapproves of anyone who might suggest that the West is exceptional or that it blazed a special path in history, although humanity has gained much from the unique heritage of Western cultural and intellectual journey. We’ll continue in the second hour, with the concentrated efforts to destroy western culture as it doesn’t fit in with the New World Order’s egalitarian ways.

We’ll address how academia accuses the west of only exploitation, racism and colonization, claiming that the west became rich from robbing others. Then, we’ll discuss how people today are disconnected from their ancestors and lack the understanding of what it took to create modern society.

Later, Ricardo talks about the multicultural push onto European countries and the double standards held upon western civilization. The hour ends on the relationship between socialists and capitalists and who is really using who?

Could be interesting.

magictransistor:

Tantric illustraion: Book of Devi-Bhagavata Purana (देवी भागवतपुराण), Opaque watercolour with gold on wasli (related to palmistry); Rajasthan (Central India); probably Mewar, circa 1820-40.

magictransistor:

Tantric illustraion: Book of Devi-Bhagavata Purana (देवी भागवतपुराण), Opaque watercolour with gold on wasli (related to palmistry); Rajasthan (Central India); probably Mewar, circa 1820-40.

(via herpicusderpicus)

(Source: caveofhypnos, via quim3ra)